04092020

Fugitive Carlos Ghosn’s escape from Japan remains a mystery as investigation continues


Former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn’s dramatic escape from Japan last week remains a mystery as Japanese officials continue to investigate how he jumped bail and boarded an illegal flight to Lebanon while awaiting trial on financial misconduct charges.

Ghosn, who remains on the lam, sparked wild speculation over how he fled the country while under surveillance, including a report that said he escaped by hiding inside the case of a musical instrument. Japan’s public broadcaster NHK later reported that video footage showed Ghosn walking out of his Tokyo home alone shortly before he left Japan.

CARLOS GHOSN ON JAPAN ESCAPE: ‘MY FAMILY HAD NO ROLE’

Turkish airline MNG Jet said Ghosn was then able to board two of its jets with the help of an airline employee who has admitted to falsifying flight records so Ghosn’s name didn’t appear. Ghosn first flew from Osaka, Japan, to Istanbul, and then on to Beirut, where he arrived on Dec. 30 and has not been seen since.

It was unclear how Ghosn was able to make the 300-mile trip from his home in Tokyo to get on his flight in Osaka without arousing suspicion.

A private security guard stood outside the house of ex-Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn in Beirut, Lebanon, on Sunday. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Japan’s Justice Minister Masako Mori said Sunday that she had ordered an investigation into Ghosn’s stunning flight from the country after he announced his arrival in Lebanon on Dec. 31. Mori vowed to beef up immigration checks but didn’t elaborate on any specific action Japan might take to get Ghosn back.

“Our nation’s criminal justice system protects the basic human rights of an individual and properly carries out appropriate procedures to disclose the truth of various cases, and the flight of a suspect while out on bail is never justified,” she said in a statement.

Ghosn was arrested in November 2018 on financial misconduct charges of under-reporting his future compensation and breach of trust. His trial was not expected to begin until April at the earliest.

Ghosn, the former CEO of Nissan, was awaiting trial in Japan on financial misconduct charges. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)

Ghosn, the former CEO of Nissan, was awaiting trial in Japan on financial misconduct charges. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)

Ghosn issued a statement last week saying he had fled from what he called Japan’s “rigged” justice system.

The conviction rate is higher than 99 percent in Japan. The country’s justice system has come under fire from human rights advocates for its long detentions, the reliance on confessions and prolonged trials.

FLIGHT RECORDS OF GHOSN ESCAPE FALSIFIED TO HIDE AUTO EXEC’S TRAVEL, JET FIRM SAYS

Even if Ghosn had been found not guilty, the prosecutors could have appealed, and the appeals process could have lasted years.

Interpol has since issued a wanted notice for Ghosn. However, since Japan has no extradition treaty with Lebanon, it is unlikely he will be sent back, according to attorney Page Pate, who handles international extradition matters.

“He’s unlikely to have to go back to Japan – as long as he stays in Lebanon,” Page Pate told FOX Business last week. “He could be arrested if he tries to leave Lebanon [but] it’s highly unlikely the government in Lebanon will send him back.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Ghosn, who has yet to make a public appearance, has said he will speak to reporters Wednesday.

Fox Business’ Stephanie Pagones and The Associated Press contributed to this report.



Source link

What Next?

Recent Articles